Execution Squares (No.20), 2008

Hrair Sarkissian
Execution Squares (No.20), 2008
Lamda print mounted on aluminium
125 x 175 cm
Sharjah Art Foundation Collection

Artist's Statement

In some countries, the death penalty by execution still exists for crimes such as murder, rape and treason. In Syria, this form of punishment is still carried out in major public squares, commonly found in the heart of the city where the community gathers for various activities. Occasionally, these squares are near the scene of the crime. The reasoning behind this is to allow the public to see the sentence that one would incur for a particular crime but also as a means of revenge on behalf of the victim and his family.

These executions are seen as public events, where people who pass by become witnesses – willingly or not – to the extinguishment of the life of individuals who have committed a crime. Hrair Sarkissian


2009

This project was part of Sharjah Biennial 10

Artwork Images

Execution Squares

Hrair Sarkissian
2008

One of fourteen lamda prints
Mounted on aluminium
128 x 163 cm
Sharjah Art Foundation Collection

View all images
Execution Squares Image

Execution Squares

Hrair Sarkissian
2008

One of fourteen lamda prints
Mounted on aluminium
128 x 163 cm
Sharjah Art Foundation Collection

Execution Squares Image

Execution Squares

Hrair Sarkissian
2008

One of fourteen lamda prints
Mounted on aluminium
Installation view
Sharjah Art Foundation Collection
Photo by Alfredo Rubio

Execution Squares Image

Execution Squares

Hrair Sarkissian
2008

Two of fourteen lamda prints
Mounted on aluminium
Installation view
Sharjah Art Foundation Collection
Photo by Alfredo Rubio

Execution Squares Image

Execution Squares

Hrair Sarkissian
2008

Five of fourteen lamda prints
Mounted on aluminium
Installation view
Sharjah Art Foundation Collection
Photo by Alfredo Rubio

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Execution Squares Image

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Execution Squares

Sarkissian, Hrair

Hrair Sarkissian’s photographs reflect on personal memories, using subjectivity as a way to navigate stories that official histories are unable to tell.